Kehidupan Alam Liar Afrika

Foto-Foto Kehidupan Alam Liar Afrika, merupakan salah satu dari   koleksi gambar Alam ,Hewan yang ada di galeri kami. , kami akan memberikan gambar-gambar unik dan keren terbaik khusus buat Anda. Enjoy and Share!

gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar 

Gambar-gambar dan foto kehidupan liar di Afrika yang sangat menakjubkan, Termasuk gambar dan foto binatang-binatang liar khas Afrika seperti Singa, Jerapah, Zebra, Kuda Nil, Gajah, Rusa dan lain-lain.

gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liargambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar  gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar  gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar gambar afrika, wallpaper kehidupan binatang liar

Secretary Bird

Secretary Bird, an African bird of prey. It is a long-legged bird about four feet (1.2m) in height with a head and hooked beak similar to a hawk’s. Its plumage is blue-gray except for black wing tips, thighs, tail, and crest. The bird derives its name from its long crest feathers, which stick out from the back of its head somewhat like the quill pens that office workers once carried behind their ears.

The secretary bird is famous as a hunter of snakes but also eats rodents, large insects, small birds, and eggs. It hunts on foot in open, sparsely wooded grasslands south of the Sahara. It is believed that secretary birds mate for life. The pair builds a nest of sticks on top of small trees. Usually two eggs, white with reddish-brown streaks, are laid in the nest.

The secretary bird

The secretary bird is a long-legged bird about four feet in height.

How Did the Secretary-Bird Get Its Name?

Long ago, secretaries wrote and copied letters by hand. They stuck quill pens behind their ears when they weren’t using them. The black plumes of this bird reminded people of quill pens. So they named the bird the secretary-bird.

Secretary-birds live on grassy plains in parts of Africa. These birds are tall, and they have much longer legs than other birds of prey. They run through the grass, attacking prey with their feet and wings. Secretary-birds catch and eat large insects, snakes, small mammals, and lizards. They also eat the eggs of other birds.

When it’s time to nest, secretary-birds build unusual homes. They use sticks, leaves, and grass to make a kind of platform. Both parents incubate the eggs and share in feeding the chicks.

Secretary Bird3 Secretary Bird4 Secretary Bird5 Secretary Bird Secretary Bird1 Secretary Bird2

The secretary bird is Sagittarius serpentarius, the only member of the family Sagittariidae.

LAMMERGELER

LAMMERGELER

Lammergeier, a large vulture that lives in the mountains of Africa, southern Europe, and southern Asia. It is also called the bearded vulture and bearded griffin. It differs from other vultures in that its head is fully feathered. An adult lammergeier is about 42 inches (107 cm) long, with a wingspread of more than 9 feet (2.7 m). It is black to brown above, tawny below, with a white head and a black stripe on each cheek.

The lammergeier feeds on dead animal matter. It is particularly fond of bone marrow, which it obtains by carrying bones to great heights and dropping them on rocks. The female lays a single egg (sometimes two) about three inches (7.6 cm) long in a nest of sticks usually built on a rock ledge.

Lammergeier

Lammergeiers are rare. They were formerly killed in large numbers because people feared (without justification) that they carried off children and domestic animals; the birds were also hunted as trophies. Since 1986, some lammergeiers bred in European zoos have been released into the wild; in 1997 one such pair hatched the first wildbred offspring in more than a century. In 1998 a lammergeier breeding center was opened in the Swiss Alps.

The lammergeier is Gypaëtus barbatus of the family Accipitridae.

The Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), also known as the Lammergeier or Lammergeyer, is a bird of prey, and the only member of the genus Gypaetus. Traditionally considered an Old World vulture, it actually forms a minor lineage of Accipitridae together with theEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), its closest living relative. They are not much more closely related to the Old World vultures proper than to, for example, hawks, and differ from the former by their feathered neck. Although dissimilar, Egyptian and Bearded Vultures both have a lozenge-shaped tail that is unusual among birds of prey

Kite & Lammergeler

Kite, a hawklike bird with long, pointed wings and a long tail. It is noted for its ability to soar and glide. Kites are found in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and from the southern United States to South America. They live mainly in marshes and woods, feeding on insects, snakes, snails, and small mammals. North American species are the swallow-tailed kite, a bird with black-and-white feathers and a deeply forked tail; the Mississippi kite, dark gray with a black tail; the Everglade, or snail, kite, dark gray with red legs (male) or buff with brown streaks (female); and the white-tailed kite, pale gray with white on the tail, head, and underparts. The black-shouldered kite, found throughout most parts of the world, resembles the white-tailed kite; the common names of the two birds are often used interchangeably. Several species of kites are endangered because of loss of habitat.

kite-info0

The kite is noted for its ability to soar and glide.

How Do Kites Do?

This snail kite catches its food while flying. It snatches up dragonflies and other large insects with its claws. Or, it zooms past a tree and grabs a lizard or a frog from a branch. The kite also drinks while in flight. It flies down low over the water to sip.

Kites also do some of their nest-building tasks “on the wing.” Kites use twigs to build their nests. To gather the twigs, they fly over the treetops. They break off small branches while they are still in flight.

Kites belong to the family Accipitridae. The swallow-tailed kite is Elanoides forficatus; the Mississippi, Ictinia mississippiensis; the Everglade, Rostrhmus sociabilis plumbeus; the white-tailed, Elanus leucurus; the black-shouldered, Elanus caeruleus.

Kite is a common name for birds of the family Accipitridae. (Sumber)

  • Subfamily Elaninae
    • Genus Elanus
      • Black-winged Kite, Elanus caeruleus
      • Black-shouldered Kite, Elanus axillaris
      • White-tailed Kite, Elanus leucurus
      • Letter-winged Kite, Elanus scriptus
    • Genus Chelictinia
      • Scissor-tailed Kite, Chelictinia riocourii
    • Genus Machaerhamphus
      • Bat Hawk, Machaerhamphus alcinus
    • Genus Gampsonyx
      • Pearl Kite, Gampsonyx swainsonii
    • Genus Elanoides
      • Swallow-tailed Kite, Elanoides forficatus
  • Subfamily Milvinae
    • Genus Harpagus
      • Double-toothed Kite, Harpagus bidentatus
      • Rufous-thighed Kite, Harpagus diodon
    • Genus Ictinia
      • Mississippi Kite, Ictinia mississippiensis
      • Plumbeous Kite, Ictinia plumbea
    • Genus Rostrhamus
      • Snail Kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis
    • Genus Helicolestes
      • Slender-billed Kite, Helicolestes hamatus - formerly in Rostrhamus
    • Genus Haliastur
      • Whistling Kite, Haliastur sphenurus
      • Brahminy Kite, Haliastur indus
    • Genus Milvus
      • Red Kite, Milvus milvus
        • Cape Verde Kite, Milvus (milvus) fasciicauda - extinct (2000)
      • Black Kite, Milvus migrans
      • Black-eared Kite, Milvus (migrans) lineatus
      • Yellow-billed Kite, Milvus (migrans) aegyptius
    • Genus Lophoictinia
      • Square-tailed Kite, Lophoictinia isura
    • Genus Hamirostra
      • Black-breasted Buzzard, Hamirostra melanosternon

A few of the Perninae are also called kites.

  • Grey-headed Kite, Leptodon cayanensis
  • White-collared Kite, Leptodon forbesi
  • Hook-billed Kite, Chondrohierax uncinatus

Whistling Kite1 White-tailed Kite White-tailed Kite1 Yellow-billed Kite Square-tailed Kite Black-breasted Buzzard Black-shouldered_Kite Letter-winged Kite1 Bat Hawk Black Kite Black-shouldered Kite Black-winged Kite Brahminy Kite Brahminy Kite1 Double-toothed Kite kite-info0 Letter-winged Kite Milvus_migrans_2005-new Mississippi Kite Pearl Kite Plumbeous Kite Red Kite Rufous-thighed Kite Scissor-tailed Kite SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA Snail Kite Swallow-tailed Kite Whistling Kite

Lammergeler

Lammergeier, a large vulture that lives in the mountains of Africa, southern Europe, and southern Asia. It is also called the bearded vulture and bearded griffin. It differs from other vultures in that its head is fully feathered. An adult lammergeier is about 42 inches (107 cm) long, with a wingspread of more than 9 feet (2.7 m). It is black to brown above, tawny below, with a white head and a black stripe on each cheek.

The lammergeier feeds on dead animal matter. It is particularly fond of bone marrow, which it obtains by carrying bones to great heights and dropping them on rocks. The female lays a single egg (sometimes two) about three inches (7.6 cm) long in a nest of sticks usually built on a rock ledge.

Lammergeiers are rare. They were formerly killed in large numbers because people feared (without justification) that they carried off children and domestic animals; the birds were also hunted as trophies. Since 1986, some lammergeiers bred in European zoos have been released into the wild; in 1997 one such pair hatched the first wildbred offspring in more than a century. In 1998 a lammergeier breeding center was opened in the Swiss Alps.

The lammergeier is Gypaëtus barbatus of the family Accipitridae.

Kestrel

Kestrel, an Old World falcon. It is also called windhover because of its habit of hovering against the wind while scanning the earth for prey. The mature bird is about 13 inches (33 cm) long. The kestrel feeds chiefly on insects and mice, but kills small birds also.

The American kestrel,

The American kestrel, or sparrow hawk, feeds chiefly on insects and mice.

The American kestrel, or sparrow hawk, is a closely related American species about 11 inches (28 cm) long. The female is brownish, barred with black. The male is slate-blue on the wings and the rear of the back.

Is Flapping the Only Way to Fly?

The kestrel can hover, or stay in one place in the air, with its wings beating rapidly. For this reason, the it is known as a windhover. As it hovers, a kestrel also hunts for prey. It dives down and uses its strong talons to strike its prey. Its catch might be a mouse, a lizard, or a grasshopper.

Kestrels live all over the world, except Antarctica. They nest in trees or on cliffs or tall buildings. While looking for prey, kestrels may perch on telephone wires or poles. Kestrels can often be seen along country roads. They can be spotted around suburban houses, too.

AJH-kestrel-launch

Kestrel

kestrel-cute-wallpaper-2013-0

Kestrel1american kestrel

Kestrels belong to the falcon family, Falconidae. The American kestrel is Falco sparverius. The common kestrel is F. tinnunculus, and the lesser kestrel is F. naumanni.

Hawk & Marsh Hawk

Hawk

Hawk, a bird of prey found in most parts of the world. Hawks belong to the same family as eagles and kites and are closely related to falcons, ospreys, and vultures. They have strong talons (claws) for catching and holding prey while they tear the flesh with their sharp, curved beaks. Hawks have powerful wings and keen eyesight. They are swift fliers and can soar for long periods.

Hawks

Hawks soar high in the air searching for prey.

Hawks vary considerably in size according to the species. The female is usually larger and stronger than the male. Hawks vary in color to some extent, but most are gray or reddish brown on top and whitish underneath. They usually have darker spots or streaks on the neck, breast, and legs and darker bars on the tail and wings. Their legs are feathered, in some species right down to the toes. Usually the bills are black, the feet yellow, and the talons black.

Feeding

Most hawks hunt by day, feeding on smaller birds and land animals. The bat hawk of Asia and Africa, however, hunts bats at night. For many years farmers and hunters killed all hawks on sight to protect poultry and young farm animals, as well as song and game birds. However, it has been found that only a few kinds of hawks harm livestock. The damage they do is far outweighed by their help in ridding farms of such pests as rats, mice, gophers, rabbits, and grasshoppers.

The northern harrier

The northern harrier feeds primarily on mice.

What Makes a Hawk a Bird of Prey?

Hawks are another kind of bird of prey. Hawks hunt during the day. So do most other birds of prey—except owls. (Most owls, as you know, hunt at night.) Like owls, hawks have strong legs and feet with sharp, curved talons. They also have powerful beaks for catching and eating prey.

This sharp-shinned hawk is a forest hawk. It has short, rounded wings and a long tail. This hawk can gain speed quickly and make sharp turns. These skills are important in hunting in woods where there are lots of trees.

A sharp-shinned hawk sits on a perch and watches for prey. Then it darts down and pounces. Its long, thin toes and sharp talons are just right for grasping songbirds, which it often catches in flight. This hawk has to eat 1/4 of its body weight each day.

How Do Hawks Care for Their Feathers?

Like all birds of prey, hawks spend time taking care of their flying equipment, which is their feathers. Hawks sometimes bathe by splashing at the edge of a lake or a stream. Or, they may take dust baths to get rid of fleas.

A bird’s feathers are made of a network of straight, thin parts called barbs and parts with tiny hooks called barbules. The barbs and barbules can come apart and get ruffled. Birds smooth their feathers with their beaks. They put the barbs and barbules back together, like fixing a zipper. They spread oil on their feathers to protect and waterproof them. The oil comes from a small gland near the bird’s tail.

Nesting

Hawks build bulky nests of sticks on rocky cliffs or hills, or in trees. A few species nest on the ground. The eggs are whitish or light blue, usually spotted with brown, and are two to seven in number, according to the species. The newly hatched young are covered with white down. They are looked after by both parents for a month or six weeks until they are able to fly.

Hawks of the United States

Hawks found in the United States are divided into the following groups: short-winged hawks, broad-winged hawks, and harriers. All three groups belong to the family Accipitridae. A number of birds belonging to other families are sometimes called hawks. An example is the American sparrow hawk, a member of the falcon family, Falconidae.

Short-winged Hawks,

or Bird Hawks, belong to the genus Accipiter. They have small heads and long tails. They are sometimes called blue darters because of their gray-blue backs and their ability to maneuver in heavily wooded areas. Several species are used in falconry. Three species of short-winged hawks are found in the United States:

The Goshawk,

the largest of the short-winged hawks, is 20 to 24 inches (50 to 60 cm) in length and has a blackish crown, blazing red eyes, and pale-gray underparts. Its name comes from “goose hawk,” for the bird was formerly trained to hunt geese and other game birds. In America the goshawk breeds in the woodlands of Canada and the northern United States, wintering southward into Mexico. Usually three to four bluish-white eggs are laid in a nest of sticks built high in a tall tree.

The goshawk is A. gentilis.

The goshawk

The goshawk has a blackish crown, blazing red eyes, and pale-gray underparts.

Cooper’s Hawk

is 14 to 20 inches (35 to 50 cm) long. The top of its bead is blackish and its breast is reddish brown. It breeds from the woodlands of southern Canada to the Gulf States and northern Mexico, and winters as far south as lower Central America.

Cooper’s hawk is A. cooperii.

The Sharp-shinned Hawk

resembles Cooper’s hawk but is only 10 to 14 inches (25 to 35 cm) long. It ranges over all of North America, breeding south to Florida and northern Mexico and wintering south to Panama.

The sharp-shinned hawk is A. striatus.

Broad-winged Hawks, or Buzzard Hawks,

belong to the genus Buteo. They are noted for their habit of soaring in wide circles. Their tails are broad and rounded. Ten species of broad-winged hawks are found in the United States. They include the following:

The Red-shouldered Hawk

is 18 to 24 inches (45 to 60 cm) long. It is grayish brown on top with rusty-red shoulders, and a paler reddish-gray underneath. There are dark bands across wings and tail. It breeds over most of Canada and the United States south to northern Mexico, wintering in the southern part of its range.

The red-shouldered hawk is B. lineatus.

The Red-tailed Hawk,

19 to 24 inches (48 to 60 cm) long, is dark brown on top, except for the rusty-red tail. The tail is whitish underneath. Red-tailed hawks are whitish on the breast, with brown streaks across the belly. There are subgroups, of phases, of the red-tailed hawk that differ in color from the larger group. One of these is sooty black except for the red tail, another is almost white, and a third is reddish and buff all over. The red-tailed hawk breeds all over North America south to the West Indies.

The red-tailed hawk is B. jamaicensis.

What Is a Buteo?

A buteo (BYOO tee oh) is a soaring hawk. A buteo glides high in the air, using its remarkable eyesight to scan the ground for prey. When a buteo like this red-tailed hawk spots prey, it dives down. It strikes the prey with sharp talons. Then it carries the prey to a perch, where the hawk can eat safely.

Buteos are powerful fliers. They need to be, because their prey include rabbits and pheasants. These animals are heavier than the prey eaten by forest hawks. It takes young buteos a long time to become good hunters.When courting, male buteos do spectacular high flights and dives. A courting pair may hold claws and do cartwheels in the air.

The Rough-legged Hawk

gets its name from the feathers covering the front of its legs. It is 20 to 24 inches (50 to 60 cm) long. Most rough-legged hawks are brown, white, and reddish on top. The whitish breast is streaked with brown, and the white tail has a broad black band at the end. There is a black phase of the rough-legged hawk. The rough-legged hawk breeds in the Arctic and winters from southern Canada to Louisiana and Texas.

The rough-legged hawk is B. lagopus.

Harriers

belong to the genus Circus. They have long, tapered wings and long legs. Of the 10 species of harriers, only one species, the marsh hawk, is found in the United States.

Hawk-Goshawk_dove4 HawkToronto1

Marsh Hawk

Marsh Hawk, or Northern Harrier, a bird of prey that lives in marshy or grassy areas of North America; it is the only harrier found in the Americas. The bird has long, yellow legs, a long tail, and an owl-like, disc-shaped face. The male, about 20 inches (50 cm) long, has a bluish-gray back, black wingtips, a white rump, and whitish under-parts. The slightly larger female is dark brown with buff streaks.

Marsh hawks hunt while flying close to the ground. They feed chiefly on mice, small birds, frogs, and snakes. Four to six bluish-white eggs are laid in a grass nest built on the ground. The young mature in about two years.

The marsh hawk is Circus cyaneus hudsonius of the hawk family, Accipitridae.

Marsh Hawk_-Alturas,_California,_USA Marsh Hawk Northern_(Hen)_Harrier Marsh Hawk Wildlife_Refuge,_New_Mexico,_USA_-flying-8

Eagle

Eagle, a bird of prey belonging to the hawk family. Eagles have hooked beaks, curved claws (called talons), exceptionally keen eyesight, powerful wings, strong bodies, and feathered legs. In mythology the eagle has symbolized the sun. The bird has been used as a symbol of power, courage, and majesty. The Romans believed the eagle to be Jupiter’s favorite bird, and it became the emblem of the Roman Empire. American Indians used the eagle as a symbol of the thunderbird, a mythical bird they thought caused thunder and lightning.

eagle-info0

The eagle is a symbol of power, courage, and majesty.

The eagle is the national emblem of the United States and was used as a symbol by czarist Russia. It appears on either the flag or the coat of arms of Albania, Austria, Ecuador, Germany, Mexico, Poland, and Spain; and on the flag and seal of Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Utah.

There are two main groups of eagles: (1) land eagles, which have leg feathers that extend downward to the toes; and (2) sea eagles, or ernes, which have leg feathers extending only halfway to the toes. The most familiar North American eagles are the golden eagle, a land eagle; and the bald eagle, a sea eagle.

Land Eagles

The Golden Eagle is native to Europe, Asia, and North America. The American golden eagle is found in deciduous forests from Alaska to central Mexico and from New England to the southern Appalachians. It is named for the golden markings on the nape of the neck. The body and legs are dark brown. The golden eagle is 30 to 41 inches (76 to 104 cm) long and has a wingspan of 76 to 92 inches (1.9 to 2.3 m). The female is usually smaller than the male.

eagle-info1

The golden eagle spreads its talons to grasp prey.Like other species of eagles, the golden eagle builds a large nest of sticks in a tall tree or on a rocky ledge. The nest is about five feet (1.5 m) high and seven feet (2 m) across. The same nest is often reused each year although it is usually repaired and enlarged. The female lays two or three whitish eggs with brown blotches. The young hatch in about four weeks. The eaglets are fed by both parents and remain in the nest until they are able to fly, about 9 to 12 weeks later.

Other Land Eagles

The harpy eagle, found in lowland forests from southern Mexico to Argentina, is blackish-gray with a divided black crest resembling a pair of horns. Its talons, more powerful than those of any other bird of prey, are used to capture birds and sloths, its main sources of food. The monkey-eating eagleof the Philippines is grayish-brown with stiff buff-colored feathers that stand up on the crown and nape of the neck. It lives in dense forests and feeds on monkeys, birds, and squirrels. Along with the harpy eagle, it is an endangered species. The crowned eagleof Ethiopia is bluish-black. Its double crest of white feathers is highly prized in Africa for use in ceremonial headdresses. The crowned eagle feeds on small antelopes and birds.

eagle-info2

The wedge-tailed eagle is the largest bird of prey in Australia.

Who Is a “Flying Monster”?

Harpy eagles are named after the “flying monsters” that appear in the myths of ancient Greece and Rome. There are eagles in the myths of many different groups of people, including the Native Americans. Perhaps this is because eagles are among the largest and most powerful birds of prey.

Harpy eagles of the South American rain forests are some of the biggest and strongest eagles in the world. Harpy eagles weigh more than 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms). When they spread their wings, their wingspan measures 7 feet (2 meters). Harpy eagles can kill animals as heavy as sloths or monkeys.

Sea Eagles

The Bald Eagle

or American Eagle, is the national bird of the United States. The bald eagle is so named because its whitefeathered head appears bald when seen from a distance. It has a brown body, white tail, and thick yellow bill. The bald eagle is found throughout North America, from Alaska to Mexico. In the United States it is protected by federal law.

eagle-info3

The bald eagle is the national bird of the United States.

Bald eagles are about 30 to 43 inches (76 to 109 cm) long with a wingspan of 78 to 96 inches (2 to 2.4 m). Females are usually larger than males. Bald eagles are found near lakes, rivers, marshes, and seacoasts. They feed on fish, small mammals, birds, and carrion. They have exceptional vision and are believed to see small objects at a distance of up to three miles (5 km).

The nest of the bald eagle is similar to that of the golden eagle, but it is usually located in a tree near water. The female lays two or three white eggs. The eaglets are light brown for about seven years, then acquire their adult plumage.

Which Eagle Is a Pirate?

Bald eagles are well known for pirating, or stealing, fish from other fishing birds. Two biologists once saw an eagle attack an osprey that was carrying a fish high in the air. The eagle fought until the osprey dropped the fish. Then the eagle dived and caught the falling fish before it hit the water.

Bald eagles also eat water birds, such as coots and herons. Sometimes they eat carrion. Bald eagles are even big and strong enough to kill and eat geese and jackrabbits.

Eagles build big, stick nests called aeries (AIR eez) in tall treetops or on cliffs. Eagles often use the same aerie year after year, adding new sticks each year. Young bald eagles have dark feathers all over. They don’t get their white head feathers until they are 6 or 7 years old. By then, they are skilled hunters and are old enough to breed.

Other Sea Eagles

Steller’s sea eagleis found in arctic regions. It is black and white with a long, wedge-shaped tail and a long, narrow bill. The white-tailed sea eagle, or gray sea eagle, is found in Iceland and Greenland and from Norway to Siberia and Japan. It is similar in size and color to the bald eagle but has a light brown head and gray patches on the wings. It is an endangered species.

eagle-info4

Steller’s sea eagle is one of the largest and most powerful raptors.Eagles belong to the hawk family, Accipitridae. The golden eagle is Aquila chrysaetos; harpy eagle, Harpia harpyja; monkey-eating eagle, Pithecophaga jefferyi; crowned eagle, Stephanoaetus coronatus. The bald eagle is Haliaeetus leucocephalus; Steller’s sea eagle, H. pelagicus; white-tailed sea eagle, H. albicilla.

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Species

Martial Eagle in Namibia

Philippine Eagle, Pithecophaga jefferyi in Southern Philippines

Wedge Tailed Eagle in Australia

A Steppe Eagle in Lahore Zoo, Pakistan

Short-toed Snake Eagle in flight

Major new research into eagle taxonomy suggests that the important genera Aquila and Hieraaetus are not composed of nearest relatives, and it is likely that a reclassification of these genera will soon take place, with some species being moved to Lophaetus orIctinaetus.[15]

  • Bonelli’s Eagle, and the Booted Eagle have been moved from Hieraaetus to Aquila.
  • Either the Greater Spotted Eagle and Lesser Spotted Eagle should move from Aquila to join the Long-crested Eagle in Lophaetus, or, perhaps better, all three of these species should move to Ictinaetus with the Black Eagle.
  • The Steppe Eagle and Tawny Eagle, once thought to be conspecific, are not even each other’s nearest relatives.

FAMILY ACCIPITRIDAE

  • Subfamily Buteoninae – hawks (buzzards), true eagles and seaeagles
    • Genus Geranoaetus
      • Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle, Geranoaetus melanoleucus
    • Genus Harpyhaliaetus
      • Crowned Solitary Eagle, Harpyhaliaetus coronatus
      • Montane Solitary Eagle, H. solitarius
    • Genus Morphnus
      • Crested Eagle, Morphnus guianensis
    • Genus Harpia
      • Harpy Eagle, Harpia harpyja
    • Genus Pithecophaga
      • Philippine Eagle, Pithecophaga jefferyi
    • Genus Harpyopsis
      • Papuan Eagle, Harpyopsis novaeguineae
    • Genus Oroaetus
      • Black-and-chestnut Eagle, Oroaetus isidori
    • Genus Spizaetus
      • Cassin’s Hawk-Eagle, Spizaetus africanus
      • Crested Hawk-Eagle, S. cirrhatus
      • Mountain Hawk-Eagle, S. nipalensis
      • Blyth’s Hawk-Eagle, S. alboniger
      • Javan Hawk-Eagle, S. bartelsi
      • Sulawesi Hawk-Eagle, S. lanceolatus
      • Philippine Hawk-Eagle, S. philippensis
      • Wallace’s Hawk-Eagle, S. nanus
      • Black Hawk-Eagle, S. tyrannus
      • Ornate Hawk-Eagle, S. ornatus
      • Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle, S. melanoleucus
    • Genus Lophaetus
      • Long-crested Eagle, Lophaetus occipitalis – possibly belongs in Ictinaetus
    • Genus Stephanoaetus
      • Crowned Eagle, Stephanoaetus coronatus
    • Genus Polemaetus
      • Martial Eagle, Polemaetus bellicosus
    • Genus Hieraaetus
      • Ayres’ Hawk-eagle, Hieraaetus ayresii
      • African Hawk-Eagle, H. spilogaster
      • Little Eagle, H. morphnoides
        • Pygmy Eagle, H. m. weiskei
    • Genus Harpagornis (extinct)
      • Haast’s Eagle, †Harpagornis moorei – possibly belongs in either Hieraaetus or Aquila[16]
    • Genus Lophotriorchis
      • Rufous-bellied Hawk-Eagle, L. kienerii
    • Genus Aquila
      • Bonelli’s Eagle, Aquila fasciata – formerly Hieraaetus fasciatus
      • Booted Eagle, A. pennata – formerly Hieraaetus pennatus
      • Golden Eagle, A. chrysaetos
      • Eastern Imperial Eagle, A. heliaca
      • Spanish Imperial Eagle A. adalberti
      • Steppe Eagle, A. nipalensis
      • Tawny Eagle, A. rapax
      • Greater Spotted Eagle, A. clanga – to be moved to Lophaetus or Ictinaetus
      • Lesser Spotted Eagle, A. pomarina – to be moved to Lophaetus or Ictinaetus
      • Indian Spotted Eagle, A. hastata – to be moved to Lophaetus or Ictinaetus
      • Verreaux’s Eagle, A. verreauxii
      • Gurney’s Eagle, A. gurneyi
      • Wahlberg’s Eagle, A. wahlbergi
      • Wedge-tailed Eagle, A. audax
    • Genus Ictinaetus
      • Black Eagle, Ictinaetus malayensis
    • Genus Haliaeetus
      • White-tailed Eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla
      • Bald Eagle, H. leucocephalus
      • Steller’s Sea Eagle, H. pelagicus
      • African Fish Eagle, H. vocifer
      • White-bellied Sea Eagle, H. leucogaster
      • Sanford’s Sea Eagle, H. sanfordi
      • Madagascar Fish Eagle, H. vociferoides
      • Pallas’ Sea Eagle, H. leucoryphus
    • Genus Ichthyophaga
      • Lesser Fish Eagle, Ichthyophaga humilis
      • Grey-headed Fish Eagle, I. ichthyaetus
  • Subfamily Circaetinae: snake-eagles
    • Genus Terathopius
      • Bateleur, Terathopius ecaudatus
    • Genus Circaetus
      • Short-toed Snake Eagle, Circaetus gallicus
      • Black-chested Snake Eagle, C. pectoralis
      • Brown Snake Eagle, C. cinereus
      • Fasciated Snake Eagle, C. fasciolatus
      • Western Banded Snake Eagle, C. cinerascens
    • Genus Spilornis
      • Crested Serpent Eagle, Spilornis cheela
        • Central Nicobar Serpent Eagle, S. minimus (subspecies or species)
      • Great Nicobar Serpent Eagle, S. klossi
      • Mountain Serpent Eagle, S. kinabaluensis
      • Sulawesi Serpent Eagle, S. rufipectus
      • Philippine Serpent Eagle, S. holospilus
      • Andaman Serpent Eagle, S. elgini
    • Genus Eutriorchis
      • Madagascar Serpent Eagle, Eutriorchis astur

capture1

capture2 capture3 capture4 capture5 EagleCarrion Golden_Eagle_in_flight Martial_Eagle_in_Namibia Pithecophaga_jefferyi